Who needs the Olympics when you could monologue for Australia? 

Bored young woman

Cast your mind back just 3 months and who knew self-isolation and social distancing would be a thing. But here we are adapting to life online, staying home and socialising with friends via screen.

As “Mum” in a 3-person family unit, I’m lucky to have two dear ones close by. I’ll confess, though, to a pang of envy at extended families and big share-houses… all lively conversation, pets, and good natured yelling from one part of the house to another (I know because there’s one next door – and they’re having way more fun than me).

But the grass is always greener and no doubt the neighbours would give anything for a moment’s peace and an hour at home alone. A little time to talk to yourself and set that inner monologue free.

Because monologue is a powerful thing. In psychology, it’s a running commentary of thoughts that can tell you a lot about yourself. In playwriting, it gives aways a whole lot more about a character than action and dialogue alone.

Screen Shot 2020-04-09 at 3.49.35 pm
Pete Malicki

One Sydney Community College tutor is a big fan of the monologue: as an excellent piece for audition and an opportunity to write short, sweet dialogue that gets right inside the character. In a year (that it turns out is perfect for a live streamed online event), Acting and Playwriting teacher Pete Malicki has created the inaugural World Monologue Games.

It’s open to all, with actors and amateurs alike invited to submit a performed monologue on video for judging. With 1000+ registrations so far from 48 countries, there’s a big job ahead for the judges in each region to select representatives to compete at the live-streamed final later this year. A bit like the Olympics meets Eurovision, the event will see finalists present live performances of their monologues for cash prizes and professional  kudos.

So this may no longer be an Olympic year, but 2020 will see at least one global event that celebrates the art of talking to yourself.

Claire Pickard
Sydney Community College